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Jul. 7th, 2005 @ 07:50 pm CRLA certification and other questions
Current Mood: happyhappy
Hello, everyone! I just joined the community, and I am so happy to see that there is a place for lj members who work in writing centers. I'm at Columbus State University's center (http://langlit.colstate.edu/writingcenter), where several things are happening:

1. For the first time ever, our center has opened for summer term to help students. At first, we were generating a lot of response with campus fliers, emails, and class visits (our center discourages professors from requiring visits to the center as part of any graded assignment). Now that we're reaching the end of the term, the sessions are fewer and farther between. What do you suggest for a quick boost in advertisement that wouldn't necessarily involve hosting workshops or other large scale activities?

2. We're remodeling our center, so we're currently located in a much smaller space (hence the impossibility of a workshop). Any tips on how to deal with a crowded workspace?

3. Our center is also trying to get CRLA certified. Is anyone here affiliated with them? I'd only just heard about it, and I'm excited to know that I can have serious credentials for my work as a consultant.

On a personal note: I'm shopping for schools that hire grad students to work in their writing centers. Purdue is currently at the top of my list, but I'm trying to broaden my search. My GRE scores weren't fantastic, but my GPA is fairly competitive. I'll be concentrating on Renaissance Lit, too. Rhet/comp and TESL are secondary certifications I'd like to pick up. Any advice from current/former/fellow potential grad students?

Last question, I swear: Where is everyone from? I've missed out on some of the conferences this past year, and so I haven't gotten to know some of the writing centers, esp. in my neighborhood, as well as I wish I had. Plus, more shopping material for potential graduate schools :-)
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moll_cutpurse:
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From:skybluesoul
Date:July 8th, 2005 10:31 am (UTC)
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I'm at West Chester University in PA. I'm an undergraduate student who has worked as a writing tutor for about a year now. Our center is affiliated with CRLA, but I really don't know how to go about establishing a relationship with them. It's nice to have some recognition for the work I've done. (I finished Level II cert. last semester.) Sorry I can't really answer your questions. :/ I was excited to see a new post in this community and thought I'd respond.
From:moll_cutpurse
Date:July 8th, 2005 02:36 pm (UTC)
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I didn't realize that West Chester had a writing center. My uncle and his family live out there; I was debating going to school there so that I could be near to family. I'm just not sure if the MA in English from there would transfer to another school's Ph.D. program easily.
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From:skybluesoul
Date:July 8th, 2005 03:59 pm (UTC)
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Yes, actually there is a writing center as well as a tutoring center. (I'm at the latter.) What school are you thinking of going to for your MA and Ph.D?
From:moll_cutpurse
Date:July 9th, 2005 03:45 pm (UTC)
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Right now Purdue is at the top of the list, but I have not gone back to re-research based on my content specialization (Renaissance Literature). I plan on heading to the local bookstore to check out the USA Today listings soon. Any recommendations?
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From:rainswolf
Date:August 7th, 2005 10:39 am (UTC)
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The University of New Mexico hires graduate students to work as tutors in the writing center ($12 an hour-- a good salary for a student job) and is just starting to have a few TAs each year (about $6,500 a semester-- enough here to live decently on) to do more administrative/liason things as well as tutoring.
From:moll_cutpurse
Date:August 8th, 2005 10:35 am (UTC)
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Thanks! Do you know if they have programs in British lit? I'm specifically looking for Renaissance lit.
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From:rainswolf
Date:August 8th, 2005 12:25 pm (UTC)
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MA or PhD?
The MA is generalized-- ENG500, Early British Lit, Late British Lit, AMerican Lit, Comp/Theory/Rhetoric, 3 elective courses of anything, a final seminar, and a portfolio.

The PhD is more specific and you choose your own areas of concentration. (There are some requirements but mostly you create your own degree with your advisor).

Check out the web page, there should be a link to the requirements and information on the professors, as well as lists of courses offered over the past few years.